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Tools to Avoid Relapse In Hard Times

For those struggling with addiction, treatment is an ongoing process. Those who enter an addiction treatment program like ours at Renaissance Ranch quickly realize that recovery isn’t simply complete when the program ends – it continues long beyond then, part of the reason we’re so committed to our outpatient addiction treatment programs.

When someone recovering from addiction is in times of high stress or overwhelming emotions, these are high-risk periods for relapse. Along with staying in touch with sponsors and all support networks during these times – indeed, even increasing reliance on these support channels – here are a few tactics that can help avoid relapse when life gets overwhelming.

Avoid Too Many Changes

For someone who has recently detoxed, adjusting to sobriety can be a major transition. Many people will need at least a year before they can make other big life changes, such as starting a new career or getting married.

Of course, it isn’t always possible to ward of all possible changes in life – some come no matter what we do. But emphasizing small routines, family time and leisure activities can go a long way structure-wise, and can help you adjust to bigger changes.

Support Network

Always stay in touch with a recovery support network, especially during overwhelming times. These people are here to help, and getting some of the weight of what’s going on off onto them might help cravings or relapse potential.

Physical Health

Stay in touch with your full physical health profile, as this will help with the stress of transitions. People who are fatigued, undernourished or out of shape will be more vulnerable to relapse and physical illness, and this will create a vicious cycle of stress by lowering thinking and concentration capabilities. Try to get enough sleep, stay active and eat a fresh, healthy diet. Also look to work in periods of relaxation throughout your average day.

Realistic Perspective

Take a careful, realistic look at what’s consuming your life, and which of those activities are truly necessary. Are there chores you can delegate, or projects you can opt out of? Can you reduce stress through simple reduction of your schedule in certain areas? Non-essential stressors in your life can be evaluated and, in some cases, removed for now.

Want to learn more about the right habits to undertake while in recovery, or interested in any of our addiction treatment programs? Speak to the caregivers at Renaissance Ra