Treating Addictions Through Gospel Centered Solutions

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Sometimes recognizing and accepting that you have an addiction is difficult, and admitting that you need help can be even harder. By the time you reach that point, things may have gotten really bad. You might feel like your life is in shambles, you’ve already hurt so many people, and it’s too late to change, but the good news is you’re wrong. It’s never too late for anyone. We often hear success stories because these people didn’t let the hardships stop them, neither should you.

The Road to Sobriety: Where Does it Begin?

Someone who is currently fighting with addiction can feel like they have gone a long, long way down, but climbing back to the top from your current spot means acknowledging the problem and getting help.

It starts with the acceptance that you have a problem – always. You won’t be committed to cure something that you can’t admit exists, and without the admission recovery is probably not going to magically happen on its own.

The second step is a lot harder: deciding to make a change. We understand that it can feel almost impossible to quit, despite the fact that substance abuse has probably already contributed to financial, emotional, and interpersonal problems in your life. Committing yourself to this purpose, though, makes it harder for these past problems to get in the way.

Getting Rid of a Defeatist Attitude

For every challenge in life, having the guts to push through is hard, and when it comes to addiction and recover it can be even harder. This isn’t a passing hobby or something that might be fun to try – it’s giving up a substance that it feels almost impossible to live without.

Many people find over time, though, that the hardest part is getting over addiction in your mind. Every day when you wake up, provide positive affirmations to yourself, such as “I can do it,” “Other people have done it,” or “I am strong enough for this.” By constantly boosting yourself and being your own best cheerleader, you can help get past some of the mental anguish that comes with recovery. While every day will still be a struggle, telling yourself that you can’t do it or that you are a failure will make that struggle even bigger.

Get the Right Motivation and Support

Many people who are trying to recover from addiction want to be strong on their own, but you can always benefit from the support and motivation of the people around you, particularly loved ones. Don’t think less of yourself if you need a little bit of support from time to time, because it’s a long road and a hard one to walk alone. Getting assistance from your friends and family can help you beat addiction in the short-term and remain sober for the rest of your life.

Overcoming addiction is difficult, but with the right support and advice it’s certainly not impossible.